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The second richest man in the world, Mr. Carlos Slim agrees with Frithjof Bergmann that employees should be working less hours

The second richest man in the world, Mr. Carlos Slim agrees with Frithjof Bergmann that employees should be working less hours

  Since the great recession, many groups of people are proposing or adapting correlative and sometimes very similar aspects of what Frithjof Bergmann brought together as a coordinated whole under the umbrella term “New Work”. For example, Mr. Carlos Slim, the second richest man in the world is proposing that the legal workweek in be shortened to three days per week. Thoughtfully planned, reducing the hours spent in “gainful” employment could leave a worker with time and energy to spend…

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Is “Do What You Love” Elitist?

Is “Do What You Love” Elitist?

I was pointed to a recent Slate article, “In the Name of Love,” by Miya Tokumitsu highly relevant to New Work. Tokumitsu here describes the Steve-Jobsian commandment to “do what you love” as elitism, in that only the elite can afford such a luxury, and valuing only work done through love devalues the work actually done by most of the populace, work without which the elites could not pursue their passions. Such an attitude is Randian selfishness, and has disastrous social…

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Time Banking and Mutual Aid Networks: Video Interview with Chris Petit

Time Banking and Mutual Aid Networks: Video Interview with Chris Petit

Watch it on YouTube. Chris led a group at the October 2014 New Work New Culture conference in Detroit, so I asked him to walk us through the information from his presentation there. The most immediate way for you to get out of the cycle of earn-money-working-too-many-hours-at-job and spend-too-much-money-on-things is time banking. If your community supports this (and if it doesn’t start one up, and/or hook up remotely with an existing time bank), you can sign up for a cooperative…

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Debra Rowe on DIY Energy Projects

Debra Rowe on DIY Energy Projects

Community Production requires that you fulfill more of your needs yourself instead of feeding your wages into a for-profit company. I got to interview Debra Rowe, whom I met at the 2014 New Work Conference in Detroit this last October, about working by yourself or with a community to take advantage of solar power: Watch on YouTube. Debra is the President for the U.S. Partnership for Education for Sustainable Development (http://www.uspartnership.org), Senior Advisor for the Detroit Green Skills Alliance (http://www.detroitgreenskills.org), and…

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AlterNet Covers NWNC 2014 Conference (Is New Work an Economic Theory?)

AlterNet Covers NWNC 2014 Conference (Is New Work an Economic Theory?)

One of the goals of this website and our communications group is to get coverage of New Work in more major press outlets. I’ve pitched to Salon and Slate with no luck so far, but was happy to see that Terrell Jermaine Starr from AlterNet showed up to the conference to report on it. Go read his article here. Let’s face it: we’re facing an uphill battle in trying to explain New Work to a larger populace. Starr casts the…

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Perspectives on New Culture from the NWNC 2014 Conference

Perspectives on New Culture from the NWNC 2014 Conference

This was a panel presentation from the opening day of the recent conference, 10/18/14. Watch on YouTube. After an introduction by Tawana Petty, Kim Sherobbi throws out an opening challenge: we need a culture that’s less greedy and mistrustful. As the first panel speaker (starting at 3:55), Frithjof Bergmann reflects that “we haven’t had a culture so far… the culture we have created has not make us more alive, and that’s the least a culture can do.” We have sacrificed…

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Why We Need a New Culture

Why We Need a New Culture

Back in 1930, John Maynard Keynes, the father of modern economics, predicted that by early 21st century, with productivity continuing to rise in the manner that it in fact has, we’d all be working at most 15 hours per week. The fact that this has not happened is not due to a failure of economics, but a failure of culture: we now live in an age of abundance, but cultural inertia insists that jobs continue to be the center of…

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New Work: The Briefest Possible Summary

New Work: The Briefest Possible Summary

By Frithjof Bergmann New Work is an ascent, an up-rising through the intelligent and imaginative use of a spate of startlingly innovative technologies, some of which are extremely basic, while others are miles beyond where computers are now. These technologies have in common that they are all “small-scale and small-space.” They no longer require gigantic factories with long lines of enormous machines that necessitate boatloads of capital. Instead, they can be grouped together in a neighborhood, or village or a…

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